Guidelines for Font Usage

 

Centre Salon & Spa

Presentation is crucial to all forms of communication — most of all when dealing with written communication. Unlike information conveyed personally, a written message is static. It must speak for itself. To achieve truly effective communication, one must pay equal attention to content and presentation. In written communication, the fundamental presentation element is the font.

When utilized well, a font can accomplish four things: 1) focus attention, 2) enhance readability, 3) establish a tone, and 4) project an image. Your font is the first line of defense against reader apathy — and your first chance to capture an audience and create a positive, lasting impression. To be effective, fonts should be chosen carefully and strategically. The following is a brief digest of useful font guidelines.

1. Watch Your Case

The body of most documents should use upper and lowercase text. Avoid using all upper or lowercase text anywhere in your document, as both can be difficult to read. As for headings and titles, use uppercase lettering whenever prescribed or appropriate.

2. Size Does Matter

Generally accepted writing guidelines for typical documents prescribe the use of 10-12 point font for the body, 14-48 point font for primary headings and one-half of the primary heading point size for secondary headings.

3. Keep It Simple

Simplicity is a virtue in writing. Keep this in mind when choosing a font or font mix. Remember, your font is supposed to enhance your message, not upstage it. Unless it is truly warranted, tend toward simple, inconspicuous fonts like Times New Roman or Arial. Also, these fonts, among others, are TrueType — this means that what you see on the screen is exactly what you will see on the page.

4. Be Consistent

Don’t overdo it by using three or four different styles in the same document. As a rule, never use more than two fonts in the same piece. Like the saying goes, two’s company, three’s a crowd. So once you choose your fonts, be committed and use them throughout.

5. Mix It Up

Though you should use no more than two fonts in a single document, variety is sometimes needed to break the monotony. A good way to add variety is through the use of italicized, bold or underlined text. These tools, when properly used, can signify importance, emphasis or even inflection. Just remember to use them sparingly.

6. Match Your Medium

The goal of every project is different, as is the intended audience. Accordingly, there isn’t one best font or style. The characteristics of your project should determine which font is right. When it comes to style, the above should be treated as guidelines, not gospel. If you need uppercase text, use it. If you need as additional font for a breakout section, add it. Ultimately, the most important thing is that your presentation matches your medium.

 

Signage 101

Your sign is your voice on the street. It communicates with passing pedestrians and motorists. It convinces them to come through your doors and do business with you.

Did you know?

  • Signage is the least expensive but most effective form of advertising.
  • Signage can be responsible for half of your customers – that’s right, 50 percent!
  • Signage is so important that without it you may not get a loan for your business.
  • Signage is an investment that will pay a return many times over.
  • A well-designed, well-placed sign can generate huge profits, especially when part of an overall marketing strategy.
  • Signage can no longer be an afterthought. Businesses can no longer afford to just “hang up a shingle” or throw up some plywood with painted letters. In order to compete in today’s competitive marketplace, you must think of your sign as a sophisticated, powerful marketing tool. It should work for you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year, creating the first impression of your business, telling people who you are, where you are and what you offer.

You might be thinking…

  • What are the elements of good signage?
  • What kind of sign do I need?
  • What do I need to know before buying a sign?
  • Where do I get a sign?
  • Where can I find a sign company?
  • How can I reap the benefits of good signage?
  • How can I maximize signage benefits for my business?

ISA can help guide you through the sometimes tricky aspects of finding the right sign for your business.

The Value of Signage

Watch this video about the importance of signs for your business.

Electric Sign Facts

  • Signage is the least expensive, yet most effective, form of advertising for independent and national retail businesses.
  • You pay for the sign once and it works for you 24 hours a day, 7 days a week for years. Use of other media requires paying month after month and you never have the benefit of ownership.
  • You also have no assurance that you’re reaching potential customers. From a business owner’s perspective, a sign should not be viewed as an expense, but as a capital investment. When you factor in your return on investment, signs are not expensive. An effective sign will most likely pay for itself many times over.
  • People often judge a business by how it looks on the sign.
  • Many merchants increase their business measurably just by adding a good sign. Conversely, many have gone out of business because they simply were not identified well, so not enough potential customers knew of their existence. As one sign industry professional put it, “A business without a sign is a sign of no business.”
  • We live in a mobile society. According to the United States Census Bureau, 18% of households relocate each year. As your customers move, you need to replace them by attracting new customers